Supporting Summer Learning

Support from National Grid provided students the opportunity to learn and grow during OCC’s Summer STEM Camp.

National Grid’s generosity played a critical role in ensuring students of all ages engaged in valuable learning experiences over the summer. The energy supplier’s charitable contribution of $20,000 paid dividends across campus.

College-aged students who are National Science Foundation scholars had the opportunity to take classes at no cost. Carolyn Keller (West Genesee HS, 2015) is a Mechanical Technology major. She took a Business class and a Statistics class during the summer. “I’m so appreciative that National Grid paid for my classes. It took such a weight off me. It’s nice to know National Grid supports you and wants you to succeed.”

OCC students (left to right) Oksana Drulyk, Trevor Averill and Carolyn Keller.

Trevor Averill (Tully HS, 2016), an Engineering Science major, chose to retake a Calculus class during the summer and improved his grade. “When I took Calculus during the school year I had way too much going on. Taking it during the summer allowed me to focus on it more. It really helped not having to worry about how I was going to pay for the class.”

Oksana Drulyk (Liverpool HS, 2016) enjoyed a similar experience. The Mathematics & Science major retook Calculus and performed much better the second time around. “I think it was a really good thing National Grid did supporting us. It made a big difference in my life not having to pay for this class.”

National Grid’s support also benefitted members of Girls Inc. and other students who attended OCC’s annual STEM Camp. Participants had the opportunity to engage in hands-on learning in a classroom setting, building robots and working on other STEM-related projects. Students also visited Central New York employers offering vibrant careers in STEM-related fields.

Marwa AlQuarishi

Marwa AlQuarishi, a May 2017 OCC alumna, helped supervise STEM Camp students and guide them through STEM-related projects. She received a stipend from National Grid for her services and enjoyed the experience. “When I was their age I’m sure I didn’t know as much as they do now. It’s fascinating to see what they do and how they do it.” AlQuarishi is now a student at Crouse Hospital’s School of Nursing.

“National Grid is proud to support Onondaga Community College and the STEM programs and scholarships offered to high school and college students to experience how science, technology, engineering, and mathematics play a huge role in business every day,” said Melanie Littlejohn, vice president of National Grid in New York. “Today’s students are the future leaders of Central New York, the same individuals who will one day engineer and design the systems that will continue to help improve our lives in the years and decades ahead. The STEM curriculum at OCC provides a great resource for students to learn from one another and to help spark an interest in STEM careers.”

STEM Scholars

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Students enrolled in OCC’s STEM Scholars program held their first meeting of the semester Friday, August 26. College President Casey Crabill welcomed the students to campus and encouraged each of them to make the most of everything the program offers. “We’re excited to have you on campus and have this opportunity to support you and make sure you have a good start to whatever science or technology field draws you in. We have high expectations for each of you,” said Crabill.

The STEM Scholars program is an entry point for students interested in pursuing a career within a growing industry. New York State ranks 3rd in the nation for projected growth in STEM jobs. The Bureau of Labor Statistics estimates 477,000 STEM-related jobs will be available in New York by 2018.

STEM stands for science, technology, engineering, and math. OCC offers nine different STEM degree programs including:

  • Computer Forensic Science
  • Computer Information Systems
  • Computer Science
  • Electrical Engineering Technology
  • Engineering Science
  • Environmental Technology
  • Math and Science Liberal Arts
  • Mechanical Technology
  • Nuclear Technology

Students selected to be STEM Scholars at OCC receive a scholarship renewable each semester provided they maintain a minimum 3.0 grade point average and continue full-time progress toward their associate degree.

The College’s STEM Scholars program is supported by a grant from the National Science Foundation totaling nearly $600,000, ensuring students in specific programs have both merit and need-based funding. Selected STEM scholars receive scholarships up to $5,000 per semester, and are also supported by peer mentors, faculty mentors, and are encouraged to engage in internship opportunities that will prepare them for their transfer and career choices.

OCC’s STEM Scholars program is coordinated by Associate Professor of Biology Maryann Page.

STEM Scholars Featured On CBS5 Morning Show

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Professor Maryann Page (red sweater) works with STEM Scholars as a CBS5 crew records a story on the program.

Students in OCC’s STEM Scholars program were featured on CNY Central’s CBS 5 morning newscast November 24 as part of its weekly “Terrific Tuesday’s” feature. The segment highlights outstanding students, teachers and academic programs in Central New York. CBS5 anchor Allison Bybee and photojournalist Dennis Harmon came to campus November 20 and gathered the story with Associate Professor of Biology Maryann Page and our students. Page oversees the STEM Scholars program. You can view the story here.

The STEM Scholars program is an entry point for students interested in pursuing a career within a growing industry. New York State ranks 3rd in the nation for projected growth in STEM jobs. The Bureau of Labor Statistics estimates 477,000 STEM-related jobs will be available in New York by 2018.

STEM stands for science, technology, engineering, and math. Onondaga offers nine different STEM degree programs:

  • Computer Forensic Science
  • Computer Information Systems
  • Computer Science
  • Electrical Engineering Technology
  • Engineering Science
  • Environmental Technology
  • Math and Science Liberal Arts
  • Mechanical Technology
  • Nuclear Technology

Students selected to be STEM Scholars at OCC receive a scholarship renewable each semester provided they maintain a minimum 3.0 grade point average and continue full-time progress toward their associate degree.

In 2013 the College’s STEM Scholars program received a grant totaling nearly $600,000 from the National Science Foundation, ensuring students in specific programs will have both merit and need-based funding into the foreseeable future. The first scholarships were awarded in 2014. Selected STEM scholars receive scholarships up to $5,000 per semester, and are also supported by peer mentors, faculty mentors, and are encouraged to engage in internship opportunities that will prepare them for their transfer and career choices.

STEM Scholars Begin New Academic Year

 

Students and faculty members who make up OCC’s STEM Scholars program met during College Hour on the first day of classes. The meeting was coordinated by Associate Professor of Biology Maryann Page who oversees the STEM Scholars program.

The program is an entry point for students interested in pursuing a career within a growing industry. New York State ranks 3rd in the nation for projected growth in STEM jobs. The Bureau of Labor Statistics estimates 477,000 STEM-related jobs will be available in New York by 2018.

STEM stands for science, technology, engineering, and math. Onondaga offers nine different STEM degree programs:

  • Computer Forensic Science
  • Computer Information Systems
  • Computer Science
  • Electrical Engineering Technology
  • Engineering Science
  • Environmental Technology
  • Math and Science Liberal Arts
  • Mechanical Technology
  • Nuclear Technology

Students selected to be STEM Scholars at OCC receive a scholarship renewable each semester provided they maintain a minimum 3.0 grade point average and continue full-time progress toward their associate degree.

In 2013 the College’s STEM Scholars program received a grant totaling nearly $600,000 from the National Science Foundation, ensuring students in specific programs will have both merit and need-based funding into the foreseeable future. The first scholarships were awarded in 2014. Selected STEM scholars receive scholarships up to $5,000 per semester, and are also supported by peer mentors, faculty mentors, and are encouraged to engage in internship opportunities that will prepare them for their transfer and career choices.

STEM Scholars

Elizabeth Luke (left) and Kirstin Amisano (right) are two of Onondaga's initial STEM Scholars.
Elizabeth Luke (left) and Kirstin Amisano (right) are two of Onondaga’s initial STEM Scholars.

OCC’s highly successful STEM Scholars program is continuing into the future. A recent grant totaling nearly $600,000 from the National Science Foundation ensures students in specific programs will have both merit and need-based funding into the foreseeable future. Acceptance into the program is both merit-based and need-based. Selected STEM scholars receive scholarships up to $5,000 per semester, and are also supported by peer mentors, faculty mentors, and are encouraged to engage in internship opportunities that will prepare them for their transfer and career choices.

The STEM scholars program is an entry point for students interested in pursuing a career within a growing industry. New York State ranks 3rd in the nation for projected growth in STEM jobs. The Bureau of Labor Statistics estimates 477,000 STEM-related jobs will be available in New York by 2018.

STEM stands for science, technology, engineering, and math. Onondaga offers nine different STEM degree programs:

  • Computer Forensic Science
  • Computer Information Systems
  • Computer Science
  • Electrical Engineering Technology
  • Engineering Science
  • Environmental Technology
  • Math and Science Liberal Arts
  • Mechanical Technology
  • Nuclear Technology

Students selected to be STEM Scholars at OCC receive a scholarship renewable each semester provided they maintain a minimum 3.0 grade point average and continue full-time progress toward their associate degree.

Associate Professor of Biology Maryann Page oversees the STEM Scholars program. “We’re thrilled the program will be continuing and growing into the future,” said Page. “Our incoming students will be mentored by returning students in the program. We will meet with incoming scholars on a weekly basis to keep in touch with them and monitor their progress. This type of guidance will be invaluable.”

During the spring 2014 semester 16 students were part of OCC’s first class of STEM Scholars. One of them was Elizabeth Luke who came to the College from East Syracuse Minoa High School. Luke is pursuing a Mathematics and Science degree. After graduating in May 2015 she’s planning to take advantage of the College’s “2+2 partnership agreement” with SUNY Upstate Medical University and enroll in its medical biotechnology program.

Kirstin Amisano is also one of the College’s initial 16 STEM Scholars. She’s a 2013 graduate of Baldwinsville High School whose love for science began in 6th grade when she participated in a career research project. After graduating in May 2015 she also plans to take advantage of the College’s “2+2 partnership agreement” with St. John Fisher College. “My grandfather went to school there, and it’s always been where I wanted to go,” said Amisano.

It was a busy summer for Onondaga students with STEM majors. Luke worked on a bacteria research project at Syracuse University thanks to a research scholarship she earned. Her project will have her engaged in cutting-edge biotechnology research throughout the upcoming academic year as well. Three STEM Scholars in the Nuclear Technology degree program learned important on-the-job training through internships at Nine Mile Point Nuclear Station (Daniel Loveless and Eric Schreiber) and at National Grid (Jason Densmore).

“It’s so wonderful for our students to engage these opportunities during the summer,” said Page. “When our students graduate we want them to be armed with both knowledge learned in our classroom and valuable on-the-job training experience.”