OCC’s Aerospace Scholars

OCC’s Nathan Burroughs leads his team through an activity at the NASA Community College Aerospace Scholars program at Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia.

The NASA Community College Aerospace Scholars program was everything three Onondaga Community College students could have hoped for, and then some. “The whole experience was super rewarding. It was really cool to see so many people who were passionate about what they were doing,” said Nathan Burroughs (Homer HS, 2016).

OCC’s Rebecca Agosto Matos (left) is pictured with her NASA mentor.

Burroughs, Wayne Ennis (Corcoran HS, 2007), and Rebecca Agosto Matos (East Syracuse Minoa 2017) were members of a select group of community college students chosen to visit NASA’s Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia April 14 to 17. Their adventure began much earlier in the semester when they participated in a related five-week online activity. “The time we needed to commit was definitely worth the experience on the back end,” said Ennis. “To complete the work in advance you have to have persistence,” added Dr. Fred Jaquin, a Chemistry and Physical Science Professor at OCC who oversees the NASA program on campus. “You have to have a schedule and get things done on time. You have to be committed.”

Students were put to work the moment they arrived at the Langley Research Center. They were divided into teams of 10 and no group contained students from the same college. Each team was assigned a mentor who was a NASA employee. “We were handed a box of parts and had five or six hours to build a robot. Ready? Set? Go! There was a competition at the end of the day and in the middle of the day we had to take a break and go on a tour,” said Burroughs. “The first day was stressful but we worked together and got through it,” added Matos. “It was fun. We worked through it and everything went very well,” said Ennis.

OCC student Wayne Ennis (sitting in green shirt) works with his team.

Throughout their time at Langley the students had several opportunities to interact with NASA professionals and learn from them. “I thought most of the people at NASA would have a masters or Ph.D. There were people there who had associate and bachelor’s degrees too. It was open to people from all different levels,” said Matos. “We had a talk with the Deputy Director of the Langley facility and he said he had been there 20 years which was about half of the normal career at NASA. Usually people retire after 40, 50, 60 years because they’re so passionate about what they do. It just blew me away,” added Ennis.

All three students are in their final semester at OCC and all agree the NASA experience reaffirmed they are on the right academic path. “I always knew I wanted to be a Mechanical Engineer. Going there solidified it for me,” said Burroughs. “This gave me more motivation to pursue my major. Our mentor was a Mechanical Engineer who was researching friction to understand more about launching spacecraft. It’s something I had never considered as a career,” added Ennis who is a Engineering Science major. “I’m a Mathematics & Science major. After I transfer, I’d like to backtrack credits and get an Engineering Science degree from here,” said Matos who hopes to attend Cornell in the fall.

NASA will host another Community College Aerospace Scholars program in the fall. Students interested in participating should contact Professor Jaquin at jaquinr@sunyocc.edu. “It’s a great opportunity for students. In the next 10 years we’re going to be back on the moon. There’s going to be a lot of work in engineering and aerospace. There’s a lot of terrestrial work NASA does. They do a lot of satellite data analysis and lower level flight analysis and atmospheric sampling. There are and will be a lot of job opportunities,” said Jaquin.

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Representing New York State at NASA

These three students are representing OCC and all of New York State in the NASA Community College Aerospace Scholars program. They are (left to right) Wayne Ennis, Rebecca Agosto Matos and Nathan Burroughs.

Chemistry and Physical Science Professor Dr. Fred Jaquin is proud of what Onondaga Community College students have accomplished. Again. OCC’s best and brightest have become regular participants in the NASA Community College Aerospace Scholars program. This year three OCC students have been selected. “They are the only three community college students in all of New York State to be chosen. It’s an amazing accomplishment for all of us to be so proud of,” said Jaquin. Not only do they represent all of New York State, they are also three of only 403 students chosen nationwide.

The three students are Nathan Burroughs, an Engineering Science major from Homer High School (2016) ; Wayne Ennis, an Engineering Science major from Corcoran High School (2007) and Rebecca Agosto Matos, a Mathematics & Science major from East Syracuse Minoa High School (2017). “I’m excited about this opportunity,” said Agosto Matos. “I had done robotics with NASA previously and learned a lot from it.”

Each student will take part in a five-week online activity which will culminate with a four-day on-site visit to NASA’s Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia. Students will have the opportunity to interact with NASA engineers and employees as they learn more about careers in science and engineering. While at NASA students will form teams and establish fictional companies interested in Mars exploration. Each team will be responsible for developing and testing a prototype rover, forming a company infrastructure, managing a budget and developing communications and outreach. “Being able to go to NASA and work with NASA professionals is very exciting,” said Ennis. “I’m really looking forward to it.”

Burroughs has been dreaming about space since he was a young child when the Tom Hanks movie “Apollo 13” was popular. “I grew up watching it. It’s the one VHS movie I remember watching tons and tons of time. I got a telescope when I was little with a night sky atlas. I liked going outside and looking up.”

NASA will host another Community College Aerospace Scholars program in the fall. Students interested in participating can contact Professor Jaquin for more information at jaquinr@sunyocc.edu. “Students who do this will have such an advantage going forward,” said Jaquin. “They will have an ‘in’ with NASA if they want to apply for an internship or a fellowship. NASA will know who you are.”

Congratulations to Nathan Burroughs, Wayne Ennis and Rebecca Agosto Matos, our latest class of NASA Scholars!

Julien Farges, ’13

Julien Farges, ’13 Fire Protection Technology degree has taken him around the world. His travels include a year spent working in Antarctica.

Where in the world is Julien Farges, ’13? He could be just about anywhere. Since earning his Fire Protection Technology degree at OCC he’s worked in several far away places including Antarctica and Hawaii. He’s living the advice he loves to share. “Don’t be afraid to travel to where you don’t know anybody. There’s no better way to grow and mature.”

Farges came to OCC from The Summit School in Queens where he received his diploma in 2011. His desire to help people in their time of need brought him to Central New York. “I choose OCC because it has one of the most reputable fire protection programs in the state. It’s reputable because of the department chair, Doug Whittaker (amongst other experienced instructors) and because of the bunk-in program offered by the extremely busy and progressive area fire departments.”

The bunk-in program is a win-win-win for area fire departments and students. It allows residents to receive enhanced fire protection, saves student’s a significant amount of money in housing costs and provides them the opportunity to work side-by-side with professionals while receiving valuable hands-on training 24 hours a day.

While enrolled at OCC, Farges was in the first class of bunk-in students at the Solvay Fire Department where firefighter Paul Veri helped start the program. “I learned so much from Paul and other firefighters there. We were held to a very high standard. Working with the Solvay Fire Department presented me with a wide range of experiences. In the fire service the hands on experience is just as important as classroom education, so the bunk-in program was extremely valuable.”

After earning his degree in 2013 Farges enrolled at Empire State College where he would earn a bachelor’s degree in Emergency Management. While taking classes online he worked for Rural Metro Medical Services in Syracuse for a year. Then his travels began:

  • Farges (right) and a co-worker set up a fence at Burning Man in Nevada.

    Farges spent a year with the Ocean City, Maryland Fire Department.

  • He worked as a firefighter at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia where he learned how to fight a rocket fire. “The things we had to deal with were unique. Being part of the science community was very interesting.”
  • His next stop was McMurdo Station in Antarctica where he spent about 12 months on ice. “It was a science base with dorms and a cafeteria and creative, interesting people… like a community college. I liked it the best. It’s the one place where I felt like I was at home. There’s a strong community and everyone is open-minded and well-traveled. I fell in love with the community.”
  • Farges went from Antarctica to Nevada where he spent approximately 3 months working as a medic at the Burning Man event.
  • His next stop was Honolulu, Hawaii where he served as a dispatcher for the 9-1-1 system.

Farges is now back on the mainland and driving across the country to New Orleans where he has a job lined up as an industrial firefighter. Once he settles in, he plans to continue his education by taking nursing courses.  “I’m so lucky. I’m just really having a good time experiencing so many places.”

This May it will be six years since he earned his Fire Protection technology degree at OCC but the lessons learned and the experiences he had while a student here continue to guide him. “I’m extremely grateful for my education at OCC. My classes helped me to start to think about the big picture of fire service (management) in addition to day-to-day tactical firefighter operations. It’s important when you’re starting out as a firefighter having the right people influence you. Being at OCC and doing the bunk-in program was the right type of surroundings for me.”

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Mission Accomplished

The NASA Lazer-Nauts at the Johnson Space Center include (left to right): Nathan Johnson, Brian Richardson (kneeling), Natalia Montilla, Doug Weaver, Allan O’Mara and Neil Minet. Also pictured (green shirt) is Tamra George of NASA.

Six months of planning prepared OCC’s NASA Team for its “Houston we have a problem” moment. The “Lazer-Nauts” worked through the crisis and capped off a spectacular journey to Texas. Ultimately the device they designed worked. NASA will store information about it in its digital archives for future consideration. “We’re so excited. This was a huge opportunity for us,” said team co-leader Natalia Montilla (Nottingham High School). “If what we designed was ever implemented it would be a huge honor for the school and for us.”

OCC team members explain how their anchoring device works during a poolside meeting with astronauts.

The Lazer-Nauts journey to the Johnson Space Center in Houston began in October when team co-leader Brian Richardson (Liverpool High School) received an email from NASA. OCC was being invited to submit a design for a tool or device which would be used during exploration. A team was formed under the leadership of Chemistry and Physical Science Chair Dr. Fred Jaquin. They submitted a proposal for a manually operated anchoring device, along with a community outreach plan and a budget which would cover manufacturing costs. In December the Lazer-Nauts learned their plan had been approved. They were one of nearly three dozen schools chosen to participate in the intellectual design competition and one of only three community colleges. The rest were prestigious four-year institutions like Cornell, Purdue and Columbia.

During the semester break and throughout the spring semester the Lazer-Nauts held regular team meetings, worked on their anchoring device which they built using a 3-D printer and did presentations in the community about their upcoming trip. In late May they packed up, boarded a plane a flew to Houston. “It was so exciting to get there. We said, ‘we’re here. We finally made it,’” said Montilla. “After all this work we’re finally here at the Johnson Space Center,” added Richardson.

The view from Mission Control where OCC’s Lazernauts give instructions to astronauts working underwater.

Before the Lazer-Nauts anchoring device would be tested underwater in the Neutral Buoyancy Lab, the team was required to go through the Test Readiness Review process. “We went up in front of a room filled with engineers and they grilled us,” said Richardson. “They asked, ‘have you thought of this, have you thought of this, have you thought of this?’ We got a lot of constructive criticism and feedback.”

The Lazer-Nauts learned they needed to make modifications to their anchoring device and they found what they needed during a late-night trip to a Home Depot. They bought rolls of duct tape, mesh and material they would use to attach handles to the device.

With their newly improved device in hand the Lazer-Nauts headed to the Johnson Space Center’s Neutral Buoyancy Lab, home of a six-million-gallon, 40-foot deep pool where astronauts train for space missions in a weightless environment. OCC’s team had exactly five minutes to speak with astronauts at the edge of the pool about how their device worked. Then the astronauts dove into the water and OCC’s team went upstairs to the control room. “We said, ‘we’re ready to test as we spoke with divers in the pool,” said Richardson. The Lazernauts gave step-by-step instructions while keeping their eyes on monitors showing them live, underwater pictures of what was happening.

Astronauts test OCC’s anchoring device underwater.

OCC’s anchoring device was supposed to drill down into sand but initially things didn’t go well. “Our auger was straight up and down and it wasn’t working,” said Richardson. The Lazer-Nauts quickly regrouped and suggested the astronauts try the auger at a 45-degree angle. It worked! “We learned how well we worked in a stressed environment,” Montilla said. “Even though we’d been working together for the last seven months, working together on the testing was a whole different story. We worked so well as a team in that environment, we were very proud.”

It was the ultimate “Mission Accomplished” moment. Seven months of hard work had paid off. “It was such a great experience,” said Montilla. “At NASA we got to meet so many engineers, scientists and mathematicians. It was an awesome environment to be in. We were told by NASA to treat it as a job interview. We were the first team there every day. We are so proud of what we accomplished for ourselves and the college.”

Congratulations to our Lazer-Nauts!

  • Natalia Montilla, team co-leader
  • Brian Richardson, team co-leader
  • Nathan Johnson
  • Neil Minet
  • Allan O’Mara
  • Doug Weaver

“Serving Students” on our Podcast

Our latest edition of podcast “Higher Ed News You Can Use from Onondaga Community College” is focused on the services we provide our students.

Watts

We’ll introduce you to Marcus Watts, Director of our Educational Opportunity Program. His staff works hard every day to help improve the academic performance of Central New York’s historically underserved students.

Montilla

You’ll also meet Natalia Montilla, a 2015 graduate of Nottingham High School. She came to OCC as a very intelligent but very shy student. Her involvement with numerous support organizations here helped her blossom into a top student and vocal leader on campus. Later this month she will help lead a team of students to NASA in Houston as part of a nationwide competition.

Enjoy the latest edition of Higher Ed News You Can Use from Onondaga Community College!

 

NASA Team on TV

Newschannel 9 videographer Mark Folsom captures OCC NASA team members Nathan Johnson (left) and Neil Minet (right) creating a substance which resembles the surface of a comet.

OCC’s NASA Team has received some well-deserved recognition in the Central New York media. WSYR-TV Newschannel 9 reporter Jeff Kulikowsky and photographer Mark Folsom came to campus April 26. They shot video and conducted interviews with the students. The story aired in that night’s 6 p.m. newscast. You can view it here.

Next month the six students who make up OCC’s NASA Team will travel to NASA’s Neutral Buoyancy Lab at the Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas. They’ll bring with them a device they’ve created which astronauts will use in an underwater experiment.

Planning began last semester when OCC was selected to be one of more than two dozen teams which would submit designs for tools or devices which astronauts would use during explorations. Most of the schools selected were prestigious four-year college and universities with large budgets. Only three community colleges were selected.

OCC’s team named itself the “Lazernauts.” They began working on an anchoring device that would hold packages on the surface of a comet, asteroid or small moon. The Lazernauts used a 3-D printer to create an auger made out of Acrylonitrile-Butadiene-Styrene, or ABS plastic. It’s the type of material used to make Lego’s. Each design was thoroughly tested and analyzed. Throughout the process the team stayed in touch with a NASA Astronaut who served as their team mentor. The astronaut gave advice and made sure they were staying on schedule.

The Lazernauts also created a hard substance for the auger to drill into which would simulate the surface of a comet or small planet. The process included the mixing of dry ice with hot water, creating the type of fog show you might see at a concert.

When they travel to Houston the Lazernauts will watch an astronaut dive into a 40-foot-deep pool and attempt to use their auger in wet sand. The astronaut will wear a GoPro camera. The OCC students will be in a control room, communicating with the astronaut.

OCC’s Lazernauts are:

  • Natalia Montilla, team co-leader               Nottingham High School
  • Brian Richardson, team co-leader             Liverpool High School
  • Nathan Johnson                                            Homeschooled
  • Allan O’Mara                                                  Homeschooled
  • Neil Minet                                                       Marcellus High School
  • Doug Weaver                                                  Chittenango High School

Preparing for Takeoff

OCC Lazernaut team members use a chemical reaction to create a comet-like surface to test the anchoring device they have created.

OCC’s NASA Team is on the brink of the trip of a lifetime. In May six students will travel to NASA’s Neutral Buoyancy Lab at the Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas. They’ll bring with them a device they’ve created which astronauts will use in an underwater experiment. “As we work on this project we’re experiencing what a real work environment is like,” said team co-leader Natalia Montilla. “We’re all playing important roles, making sure we’re hitting deadlines and everything is working. We’re really excited to go.”

Planning began last October when OCC was selected to be one of more than two dozen teams which would submit designs for tools or devices which astronauts would use during explorations. Most of the schools selected were prestigious four-year college and universities with large budgets. Only three community colleges were selected.

OCC’s six-person team named itself the “Lazernauts.” They began working on an anchoring device that would hold packages on the surface of a comet, asteroid or small moon. Team co-leader Brian Richardson used a computer program to design a hand-powered auger. It needed to meet specific size, weight and strength specifications.

The Lazernauts used a 3-D printer to create an auger made out of Acrylonitrile-Butadiene-Styrene, or ABS plastic. It’s the type of material used to make Lego’s. Each design was thoroughly tested and analyzed. Throughout the process the team stayed in touch with a NASA Astronaut who served as their team mentor. The astronaut gave advice and made sure they were staying on schedule.

The Lazernauts also created a hard substance for the auger to drill into which would simulate the surface of a comet or small planet. The process included the mixing of dry ice with hot water, creating the type of fog show you might see at a concert.

Throughout the next month-and-a-half OCC’s team will continue to test and tweak their design. They are also doing public outreach, making presentations to clubs and libraries about their efforts. In April WSYR-TV Newschannel 9 came to campus and did a story on OCC’s NASA Team for that evenings 6pm newscast. You can view the story here.

When they travel to Houston the Lazernauts will watch an astronaut dive into a 40-foot-deep pool and attempt to use their auger in wet sand. The astronaut will wear a GoPro camera. The OCC students will be in a control room, communicating with the astronaut.

OCC’s Lazernauts are:

  • Natalia Montilla, team co-leader               Nottingham High School
  • Brian Richardson, team co-leader             Liverpool High School
  • Nathan Johnson                                            Homeschooled
  • Allan O’Mara                                                  Homeschooled
  • Neil Minet                                                       Marcellus High School
  • Doug Weaver                                                  Chittenango High School

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Betheny Witherell

Betheny Witherell
Betheny Witherell
  • High School: Mexico, Class of 2007
  • Major: Mathematics & Science

An unfortunate event changed the direction of Betheny Witherell’s life and steered her towards a new career. Last May she was driving on Colvin Street in the Syracuse University area when her car was rear-ended. Witherell’s injuries required her to go through a series of medical imaging procedures. As she studied her X-rays she started wondering if she had stumbled upon something. “I thought it could be a career for me. I wanted to have a career that is interesting and helps people. It’s funny how things work out sometimes.”

Witherell graduated from Mexico High School in 2007 and became a Licensed Massage Therapist. In her spare time she took up rock climbing. “A lot of the people I climbed with were engineers. Climbing with them made me think about things from a scientific and mathematical perspective. I decided if I could rock climb and conquer that challenge I could go back to school.”

Witherell enrolled at OCC in time for the fall 2014 semester. Making the jump from full-time employee to full-time student was a big one. Scholarship opportunities at OCC made it possible. Witherell was named a STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) Scholar and received the Community Scholars Scholarship through the OCC Foundation. “I couldn’t have afforded college and life outside college without the scholarships. It made being in college and being successful a lot easier for me.”

Before Witherell’s car accident she was pursuing a career in geology. In the spring 2016 semester she was one of nine OCC students selected to participate in NASA’s New York Space Grant program. She took a class on campus for Methods of Scientific Research. It led to a summer internship in Colgate University’s Geology department where she focused on computer modeling and enjoyed the experience. “Any student who gets a research opportunity should take advantage of it. Learning to think logically and problem solve is very important.”

Witherell’s outstanding academic performance has earned her membership in international honor society Phi Theta Kappa. She’s also been named one of the College’s five SUNY Chancellor’s Award winners for this academic year.

Witherell plans to transfer to SUNY Upstate Medical University and pursue a degree in Medical Imaging Science/Radiography. She credits OCC’s faculty with having a significant impact on her growth as a student. “I’ve really enjoyed it here. I’ve always been amazed by how much professors want you to succeed. They all tell us, ‘We’re here for you’ and it’s true. The professors are really focused on the students and willing to give you good advice for the future.”

See how Betheny’s story could be your own!

Brian Richardson

Brian Richardson
Brian Richardson
  • HS: Liverpool, Class of 2015
  • Major at OCC: Engineering Science

Brian Richardson’s career goal came into focus on the morning of May 16, 2011 at Cape Canaveral. “I was in Florida with my aunt and uncle. I convinced them to take me to watch a shuttle launch.” It was the final launch for the space shuttle Endeavour and it made an indelible impact on Richardson. “I saw that and I was like, ‘That looks really cool!’ I started taking engineering classes in high school and got really interested in becoming an aerospace engineer.”

Four years later Richardson graduated from Liverpool High School and came to OCC. “It’s been excellent here. The professors really care about the students. They go all out for you. They’re very knowledgeable. They will work as hard as they can to make sure you succeed.”

In the spring 2016 semester Richardson was one of five OCC students selected to participate in NASA’s Community College Aerospace Scholars program. Richardson traveled to Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia where he had the opportunity to work side-by-side with NASA Engineers on special projects.

This spring Richardson is working on another NASA mission. He’s co-leading a team of OCC students designing a device which will remove soil samples underwater. The effort will culminate in May when OCC’s team will travel to Texas. Students will spend four days at NASA’s Neutral Buoyancy Lab at the Johnson Space Center in Houston where they will see astronauts use what they have designed. “It will be a great experience. We are really looking forward to it.”

Our NASA Team

OCC's NASA Team is (standing left to right): Doug Weaver, Brian Richardson, Natalia Montilla, Nathan Johnson, Neil Minet and Allan O'Mara. Seated is Dr. Fred Jaquin, Faculty Mentor.
OCC’s NASA Team is (standing left to right): Doug Weaver, Brian Richardson, Natalia Montilla, Allan O’Mara, Neil Minet and Nathan Johnson. Seated is Dr. Fred Jaquin, Faculty Mentor.

NASA needed ideas. The organization sent out a nationwide request asking college students to submit designs for tools or devices which astronauts would use during exploration. Proposals were due by November 1. NASA reviewed the ideas and selected more than two dozen colleges and universities to participate in the project.

The list included prestigious four-year schools like Cornell University, Columbia University and Rochester Institute of Technology. There were also three two-year schools chosen including Onondaga Community College. “We’re all pretty proud of this,” said OCC team co-leader Brian Richardson. “Sometimes there can be a stigma towards community colleges. This shows that stigma has no validity.”

Richardson played a key role in the selection process. In the spring 2016 semester he was one of five OCC students chosen to participate in NASA’s Community College Aerospace Scholars Program. Richardson took part in special courses and traveled to a NASA facility where he worked side-by-side with engineers.

During the fall semester he was contacted about another opportunity. “I received an email from NASA about this project asking if we’d like to try it out.” Richardson asked Chemistry and Physical Science Chair Dr. Fred Jaquin if he would be the faculty mentor. “I agreed to do it. Brian said he would work on putting a team of students together and creating a proposal,” said Jaquin.

NASA’s project was called Micro-g NExT. The term “Micro-g” represented a very low gravity environment. “NExT” stood for Neutral buoyancy Experiment design Teams. NASA needed student teams to submit designs for one of three things:

  • An anchoring device that would hold packages on the surface of a comet, asteroid or small moon.
  • A surface sampling tool astronauts would use to scoop up surface soil samples from the aforementioned bodies.
  • A sub-surface sampling device that would maintain the stratigraphy of the cored sample.

Richardson assembled a team of six students. They submitted a proposal for an anchoring device which would hold packages on the surface of a comet, asteroid or small moon. “It will be a manually operated auger-like device which comes with very specific design requirements,” said Jaquin. For example, the device must fit in a 10-inch by 10-inch by 18-inch box. It cannot have any sharp edges protruding which could damage an astronaut’s suit. It also must be neutrally buoyant so if the astronaut lets go of it underwater it won’t sink or float to the top.

The proposal also required a community outreach plan and a budget which would cover manufacturing costs. In early December OCC’s team got the news it was hoping for. Its proposal had been selected. “It was very exciting,” said Jaquin.

Being selected means OCC’s team will be traveling to Texas in May. Students will spend four days at NASA’s Neutral Buoyancy Lab at the Johnson Space Center in Houston where they will see astronauts use what they have designed. Team members will stand side-by-side with NASA Engineers and students from colleges across the country. Between now and then students will be working on designing and testing their device. NASA has given all of the participating colleges and universities a strict timeline to follow throughout the process.

Natalia Montilla is also the OCC team’s co-leader. She’s ready for the challenge that lies ahead. “This is a great opportunity for us to show what we can do coming from a community college in upstate New York. We see all of the top universities taking part in it. We’re excited to meet new people, meet NASA Engineers and learn what they do. We’re excited to go out there and use our minds.”

Below is a slideshow with each of the team members photos. Beneath that is a list of the colleges and universities selected to participate in NASA’s Micro-g NExT program.

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  • Alabama
  • Alaska-Anchorage
  • Arizona State
  • Art Institute of Seattle
  • University of Buffalo
  • UCLA
  • UC-Riverside
  • Coastal Bend College
  • Columbia
  • Cornell
  • Embry-Riddle
  • Grand Valley State
  • Illinois
  • Kapiolano CC
  • Maryland
  • Nebraska
  • Ohio State
  • Old Dominion
  • Onondaga Community College
  • Purdue
  • Rochester Institute of Technology
  • Salt Lake CC
  • Texas A&M
  • Univ of Texas at Dallas
  • Univ of Texas at El Paso
  • Univ of Texas at Rio Grande Valley
  • Virginia Tech
  • Wentworth Institute of Technology