Faculty Art Show

"Westhill Homecoming" by OCC Faculty member Allen "Skip" Frost is part of the Faculty Art Show.
“Westhill Homecoming” by OCC Faculty member Allen “Skip” Frost is part of the Faculty Art Show.

OCC Faculty members are the stars of the latest gallery show at the Ann Felton Multicultural Center. Art work from 16 faculty members make up the exhibit. Among the highlights are a series of pictures by Photography Professor Lida Suchy. Her work titled, “Portrait of a Village: the People of Kryvorivnya” portrays residents of a small European village over the course of 20 years. Her outstanding work has resulted in her being named a Fulbright Scholar and a Guggenheim Fellow.

The Faculty Art Show opened November 14. Exhibit hours are 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday’s through Thursday’s. The final day of the show will be Thursday December 8. The exhibit is free and open to the public.

A slideshow of some of the art is below.

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Featured OCC Faculty Artists include Marcus Acevedo, Meredith Cantor-Feller, Randy Elliott, Allen “Skip” Frost, Deborah Haylor-McDowell, Paul Molesky, Carmel Nicoletti, Richard Pardee, Donalee Peden-Wesley, Larry Royer, Andy Schuster, Elisha Stasko, Lida Suchy, Richard Williams, Mark Williamson and Mark Zawatski.

Guggenheim Fellow

Lida Suchy (right) in the Ukranian Village of Kryvorivnya. Her portraiture project there has spanned parts of three decades and earned her a Guggenheim Fellowship.
Lida Suchy (right) in the Ukranian Village of Kryvorivnya. Her portraiture project there has spanned parts of three decades and earned her a Guggenheim Fellowship.

OCC Photography Professor Lida Suchy has been named a Guggenheim Fellow. It’s the second prestigious award for Suchy who was named a Fulbright Scholar in 2011. Guggenheim Fellowships are intended for men and women who have demonstrated exceptional capacity for productive scholarship or exceptional creative ability in the arts.

Suchy is a first-generation American who was born into a refugee family. She chronicles communities through portraiture. Much of her work is done in Eastern and Central Europe and in immigrant enclaves in the United States. Her ongoing work is titled, “Portrait of a Village: the People of Kryvorivnya.” “For more than 20 years I have portrayed many of the village’s 2,000 inhabitants with the idea of creating a composite portrait of this community through individual portraits of its members,” she said. The series has evolved into a multi-layered community portrait that now includes the notion of cultural persistence and change through the passage of time. You can view her portraits here and see how people have changed as time has passed.

Suchy first traveled to Kryvorivnya in the early 90s, shortly after Ukraine gained its independence from the Soviet Union. Even though she’d never been there before, she felt a sense of familiarity. “In my childhood growing up in the United States the environment had been described to me in detail by my parents. I grew up in a refugee family that was forced to leave Ukraine when it fell under Soviet rule. Through my photographs I want to confront the image built up from the recollections of my parents with one of my own.”

Congratulations to Lida Suchy on her Guggenheim Fellowship and her continuing journey!