Student Speaking with Enrollment Associate at Student Central

Deadline to Register for Spring 2019 Semester Approaching

Deadline to Register Photo (1000px)

The deadline to register for Spring 2019 classes at OCC is quickly approaching. Remember, your education is worth it.

Register for classes at OCC today!

If you’re struggling to complete your education, we have services that can help you in the classroom, outside of the classroom and with your next steps like the ones listed below and more!

The Learning Center

Our tutoring support is customized to your needs. Get tutoring support for a specific course, one-on-one writing support, or study skills tutoring in friendly and convenient location.

Community Care Hub

Life can sometimes get in the way of earning your degree. The Community Care Hub (CCH) can help overcome those obstacles preventing you from earning your education. CCH can connect you with resources to help you find affordable housing, obtain food, connect you with scholarships and other financial resources, help with tax preparation, provide bus bases and more!

Scholarships

OCC awards scholarships year-round to help students finance their education. Fill out the online interest form to get started on financing your education.

Counseling Services

Personal struggles shouldn’t get in the way of your education. If you need someone to talk to, come to the counseling center. We’ll help you with what you’re going through and remind you that you’re not alone.

Career Services

Career Services will be there for you at any time during your time at OCC and beyond. They can help you build your resume, polish interview skills, connect you with internship and job opportunities and more.

Register for Spring 2019 classes!

Deadline to Register for Fall 2018 Semester Approaching

Deadline Blog Article

The deadline to register for Fall 2018 classes at OCC is quickly approaching. Remember, your education is worth it.

Register for classes at OCC today!

If you’re struggling to complete your education, we have services that can help you in the classroom, outside of the classroom and with your next steps like the ones listed below and more!

The Learning Center

Our tutoring support is customized to your needs. Get tutoring support for a specific course, one-on-one writing support, or study skills tutoring in friendly and convenient location.

Community Care Hub

Life can sometimes get in the way of earning your degree. The Community Care Hub (CCH) can help overcome those obstacles preventing you from earning your education. CCH can connect you with resources to help you find affordable housing, obtain food, connect you with scholarships and other financial resources, help with tax preparation, provide bus bases and more!

Scholarships

OCC awards scholarships year-round to help students finance their education. Fill out the online interest form to get started on financing your education.

Counseling Services

Personal struggles shouldn’t get in the way of your education. If you need someone to talk to, come to the counseling center. We’ll help you with what you’re going through and remind you that you’re not alone.

Career Services

Career Services will be there for you at any time during your time at OCC and beyond. They can help you build your resume, polish interview skills, connect you with internship and job opportunities and more.

Register for Fall 2018 classes!

Sharing Wisdom: John Dau ’05

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There is no slowing John Dau. The President of the John Dau Foundation, which provides healthcare and nutrition programs to the citizens of South Sudan recently published his third book. His latest work, “The Pillars Of Wisdom” is a collection of stories and folk tales that are told in the traditional Dinka style, which instill values and lessons through the adventures of animals and humans as they interact with nature. When John lived in Sudan before civil war ravaged his homeland and forced him to flee, he was and still is a member of the Dinka tribe.

The Dinka pillars of wisdom are: respect, empathy, honesty, fairness, sharing, listening, welcoming, brother/sisterhood, friendship, love, perseverance and other subliminal lessons. “In my homeland, we told stories to help fill the young with wisdom acquired from the tribe. They rang true when I struggled to maintain my identity, my faith, and my hope as a Lost Boy of Sudan in refugee camps in Ethiopia and Kenya (…) They ring true today, as I live and work as a U.S. citizen, husband, father, and foundation president in New York and Virginia.”

_V6B9010John has received numerous awards for his humanitarian efforts, chronicled in his 2007 book “God Grew Tired Of Us,” which documents his time as a child growing up in Sudan, escaping his homeland due to civil war, and his journey to America. The book was later turned into an award winning documentary.  He was honored as an OCC Alumni Face Recipient in 2007 and was most recently recognized as an American Association of Community College Outstanding Alum in 2014.

To purchase the book visit www.johndau.com. John currently lives with his wife and four children in Virginia.

Professor Wins National Award

Professor Malkiel Choseed will receive the American Association of Community Colleges first-ever Dale P. Parnell Distinguished Faculty Award.

The American Association of Community Colleges (AACC) is honoring Professor Malkiel Choseed. He will receive the inaugural Dale P. Parnell Distinguished Faculty award at the AACC’s annual convention. Parnell is the former President and CEO of AACC. The award was created in his memory to recognize individuals who make a difference in the classroom. “I am honored to have been nominated for this award.  It is humbling to know that my work helping students succeed has been deemed worthy of this recognition,” Choseed said.

Professor Choseed began working at Onondaga Community College in 2005. He teaches Writing and is Coordinator of the Writing Program in the English/Reading/Communication major. He played a central role in efforts which focus on underserved students including the development and implementation of the Accelerated Learning Program, the development of a Writing and Reading in the Discipline course pairing, and the rewriting of course outlines, learning outcomes and course schedules to prioritize revision. “There is almost no better feeling than seeing students not only succeed on a given assignment but begin to recognize that they are capable of succeeding in our class and beyond. I want to help people whether it’s an individual in the classroom, through changes to a program or in the way we do things here. If it can help student’s I want to be a part of it.”

Congratulations to Malkiel Choseed!

Dr. Daryll Dykes, ’83 Named National Alumni Award Honoree

Dr. Daryll Dykes, ’83

Onondaga Community College alumnus Dr. Daryll Dykes, ‘83 has been named a 2018 Outstanding Alumni Award winner by the American Association of Community Colleges (AACC). Dykes will receive the award Tuesday, May 1 at the AACC’s annual convention in Dallas, Texas.

Dykes love of medicine started early. When he was a young boy growing up on Syracuse’s west side, he enjoyed visiting his mother while she worked as a nurse. After graduating from Fowler High School in 1980, Dykes joined the United States Marine Corps as a way of paying for college. When he completed his military obligation Dykes came to OCC and majored in Mathematics & Science. “The classes and professors really ignited my passion for learning. The professors saw my talent, invested in it and pushed me to do great things,” Dykes said.

Dykes turned his passion for medicine into his career. Today he is one of the nation’s premier spine surgeons and owns his own practice, Medical and Surgical Spine Consultants of Minnesota.

Dr. Daryll Dykes, ’83

“We are so proud of Dr. Dykes and his accomplishments,” said OCC President Dr. Casey Crabill. “He is richly deserving of this recognition, and we congratulate him. We’re grateful too that in the years since he earned his degree he has been willing to return to campus and speak with students who today sit where he once sat. His message of hard work, perseverance and determination have had a positive impact on those he has spent time with.”

Dykes is one of only three national Outstanding Alumni Award honorees in 2018. He is also the fourth OCC honoree in the last five years joining Dr. Emad Rahim (2017), Laurie Halse Anderson (2015) and John Dau (2014). There are 1,462 community colleges in United States serving approximately 12 million students annually. According to the AACC, Onondaga Community College is the first institution to have four Outstanding Alumni Award honorees in five years.

Congratulations Dr. Daryll Dykes!

Recently we announced a new initiative, “The OCC Effect.” We wanted to hear from our former students about the ways in which OCC impacted their lives. If you would like to join in the conversation please visit our Alumni web site and tell us about your experience. Your success is a significant part of OCC’s story which began more than a half-century ago when we first opened our doors in 1961. We’re proud our middle name is “community” and we’d love to hear what OCC’s effect has been on you.

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Dr. Daryll Dykes, ’83 accepts his award at the AACC National Conference.

Our Alumni and “The OCC Effect” on Our Podcast

OCC’s Director of Alumni Communications Russ Corbin (left) and 2017 Outstanding Alumni Award Winner Dr. Emad Rahim (right) are featured in this month’s edition of “Higher Ed News You Can Use from Onondaga Community College.”

On this month’s edition of “Higher Ed News You Can Use from Onondaga Community College” we’re highlighting our outstanding alumni. You’ll meet Dr. Emad Rahim, a former OCC student who is a 2017 winner of the Outstanding Alumni Award from the American Association of Community Colleges. Rahim is a survivor of genocide in the Killing Fields of Cambodia. While in a concentration camp his father was executed and his older brother died of starvation. Rahim’s life story is the subject of a documentary, “Against the Odds.”

You will also meet Russ Corbin, OCC’s Assistant Director of Alumni Communications. Russ will tell us about “The OCC Effect,” a new outreach program we’ve started. If you went to college here we want you to tell us how OCC impacted your life.

It’s all on this month’s edition of “Higher Ed News You Can Use from Onondaga Community College.” Listen to it here!

“Lost Boy” Comes Home

John Dau, ’05 posed for a photo with OCC students. His book, “God Grew Tired of Us,” is the subject of this year’s common read.

Sixteen years after arriving in the United States as a refugee John Dau experienced one of the great thrills of his life when his life story, “God Grew Tired of Us,” was chosen to be OCC’s common read for the 2017-18 academic year. “This is the first place I ever went to school in America,” Dau said. “To have my book be selected for people to read means so much to me. It makes me emotional because this is where I started. Coming back home I feel honored and blessed.”

Dau was known as a “Lost Boy,” one of tens of thousands of refugees displaced or orphaned by war in the Sudan. He came to the United States in 2001 and began taking classes at OCC along with approximately 80 refugees. He would earn a degree in 2005 and today is president of the John Dau Foundation which provides healthcare and nutrition programs to the citizens of South Sudan. He is one of OCC’s distinguished Alumni Faces honorees and in 2014 he received the Outstanding Alumni Award from the American Association of Community Colleges.

Dau participated in a refugee panel discussion on campus.

Dau returned to the OCC campus in mid-October to participate in a series of events which gave students and community members the opportunity to speak with him. Events included Dinka Storytelling, a lecture in Storer Auditorium and a refugee panel discussion in which he was joined by six OCC students who were also refugees. They discussed their transition to life in the United States and the challenges associated with living so far from home. They answered many questions from those in attendance including if the United States felt like home yet, what they missed most about where they came from and what one thing they would like to take from America to their home country. Answers ran the gamut from pizza to open mindedness to the way people here want to help those in need.

Dau’s opportunity to return to campus and spend time with students was everything he hoped it would be and strengthened his bond with OCC. “This school isn’t only a place to learn. It’s a place where lost pride is redeemed and passion is grown. OCC incubated me without me knowing where I was going. OCC had the faith to allow me to come to school here and grow and now look at me coming back!”

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Dr. Emad Rahim

  • High School: Fowler, Class of 1997

Dr. Emad Rahim’s life story is the subject of a documentary titled, “Against The Odds.” He’s a survivor of genocide in the Killing Fields of Cambodia who took advantage of the opportunities he found in the United States. “My experience at Onondaga Community College not only provided me with the academic foundation I needed to find my footing in higher education, but also helped me develop the skills I needed for career advancement.” Rahim is an Endowed Chair and Director of the Project Center of Excellence at Bellevue University in Omaha, Nebraska. In 2017 he received the Outstanding Alumni Award from the American Association of Community Colleges.

Please take a moment, visit our Alumni web site and tell us how OCC impacted your life.

John Dau, ’05

 

  • Major at OCC: Humanities
  • Home country: South Sudan

John is a “Lost Boy,” one of tens of thousands of refugees displaced or orphaned by war in the Sudan. He came to the United States in 2001 and began taking classes at OCC along with approximately 80 refugees. “OCC was like a family to us. The teachers helped with school work and life lessons. It created a strong bond with me and all of the refugees.” Today he is President of the John Dau Foundation which provides healthcare and nutrition programs to the citizens of South Sudan. John is one of OCC’s distinguished Alumni Faces honorees. In 2014 he received the Outstanding Alumni Award from the American Association of Community Colleges.

Please take a moment, visit our Alumni web site and tell us how OCC impacted your life.

What to Avoid Your 1st Semester of College

1. Trying to Do It Alone

Many students try to go through college without asking for help. We’re here for you so don’t be afraid to ask for help. Need help with schoolwork? Visit the Learning Center. Need someone to talk to? Visit our Counseling Center. OCC has many services to help you inside and outside the classroom so don’t be afraid to take advantage of them.

2. Not arriving early enough for your 1st class

There’s nothing worse than starting off on the wrong foot. Give yourself enough time to get to your first class so you’re there early. Trust us, if you make it to class earlier than your professor they’ll be impressed.

3. Not Getting Involved

You’ll enjoy college a lot more if you’re involved in a club, activity or job. It can be as simple as joining one of the many clubs OCC has to offer or becoming a student officer. Check out your options by filling out the Get Involved Form!

4. Pulling All Nighters Too Frequently

Every college student pulls an all nighter to finish a project at some point. But pulling these too often can make the quality of your work suffer. Professors know the difference between a project you did the night before and one you spent days on. So don’t make a habit of staying up until 4 a.m. working on assignments.

5. Assuming College is Like High School

It’s easy to think that college is going to be easier than high school. Many people don’t take their college experience seriously enough when they come to school the first time and pay the price. Take your college experience seriously, work hard and ask for help when needed. You’ll easily avoid this pitfall.

6. Skipping Class

It’s easy to think that skipping one class won’t matter much in your overall learning. Many college freshmen fall into this pattern. But it’s important to make sure you don’t so that you don’t fall behind on your learning. It will be hard and sometimes almost impossible to make up work if you skip more than one class.

 

Remember, we’re here to help. If you require assistance, a good place to start is Student Central. Call 315-498-2000, visit us during our regular hours of operation, or email occinfo@sunyocc.edu.